The history of the trinity

The Definition of Trinity

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1. Also called Blessed Trinity, Holy Trinity. the union of three persons (Father, Son, and Holy Ghost) in one Godhead, or the threefold personality of the one Divine Being.

2. a representation of this in art.

3. Trinity Sunday.

4. a group of three; triad.

5. the state of being threefold or triple.


Trinity

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1. Christian theol Holy Trinity , Also called: Blessed Trinity the union of three persons, the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, in one Godhead.

2. See Trinity Sunday

3. Holy Trinity a religious order founded in 1198


World English Dictionary

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trinity (ˈtrɪnɪtɪ)

— n , pl -ties 1. a group of three

2. the state of being threefold


[C13: from Old French trinite , from Late Latin trīnitās , from Latin trīnus triple]

The Origins of the Trinity

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1175–1225; Middle English Trinite < Old French < Late Latin trīnitās triad, trio, the Trinity, equivalent to trīn ( us ) threefold (see trine) + -itās -ity

Bible Dictionary (Easton)

Trinity definition

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A word not found in Scripture, but used to express the doctrine of the unity of God as subsisting in three distinct Persons. This word is derived from the Gr. trias, first used by Theophilus (A.D. 168-183), or from the Lat. trinitas, first used by Tertullian (A.D. 220), to express this doctrine. The propositions involved in the doctrine are these: 1. That God is one, and that there is but one God (Deut. 6:4; 1 Kings 8:60; Isa. 44:6; Mark 12:29, 32; John 10:30). 2. That the Father is a distinct divine Person (hypostasis, subsistentia, persona, suppositum intellectuale), distinct from the Son and the Holy Spirit. 3. That Jesus Christ was truly God, and yet was a Person distinct from the Father and the Holy Spirit. 4. That the Holy Spirit is also a distinct divine Person.

A Triple Deity

A triple deity (sometimes referred to as threefold, tripled, triplicate, tripartite, triune or triadic, or as a trinity) is a deity associated with the number three. Such deities are common throughout world mythology; the number three has a long history of mythical associations. Carl Jung considered the arrangement of deities into triplets an archetype in the history of religion. Read More

The Nicene Creed & the Trinity

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The purpose of a creed is to act as a yardstick of correct belief, or orthodoxy. The creeds of Christianity have been drawn up at times of conflict about doctrine: acceptance or rejection of a creed served to distinguish believers and deniers of a particular doctrine or set of doctrines. For that reason a creed was called in Greek a σύμβολον (Eng. sumbolon), a word that meant half of a broken object which, when placed together with the other half, verified the bearer's identity. The Greek word passed through Latin "symbolum" into English "symbol", which only later took on the meaning of an outward sign of something.


The Nicene Creed was adopted in the face of the Arian controversy. Arius, a Libyan presbyter in Alexandria, had declared that although the Son was divine, he was a created being and therefore not co-essential with the Father, and "there was when he was not," This made Jesus less than the Father, which posed soteriological challenges for the nascent doctrine of the Trinity. Arius's teaching provoked a serious crisis.


The Nicene Creed of 325 explicitly affirms the co-essential divinity of the Son, applying to him the term "consubstantial". The 381 version speaks of the Holy Spirit as worshipped and glorified with the Father and the Son. The Athanasian Creed describes in much greater detail the relationship between Father, Son and Holy Spirit. The Apostles' Creed makes no explicit statements about the divinity of the Son and the Holy Spirit, but, in the view of many who use it, the doctrine is implicit in it.


THE WORD OF GOD

The Word of God does not use the terms three persons, three beng, trinity,or three deities. It tells us clearly there is ONE Lord God and no other! The Godhead is the Father, Son & Holy Ghost/ Sprit and his name is JESUS and he is the Christ (Messiah).